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Wednesday, December 11, 2013

X4-2 Exadata Announcement

These the differences with the new X4-2 just announced, along with a table comparing the differences.
1) Double the size of flashcache
2) Switch from 3tb drives to 4tb drives (HC)
3) More cpu cores
4) Increase in Infiniband throughput by using an Active-Active configuration
5) Automatic Flash compression on X3 and X4 systems (using the ACO option)


x2 X3 X4
Database
Processesor 2 x Six-Core Intel Xeon® X5675 Processors (3.06 GHz) 2 x Eight-Core Intel Xeon®E5-2690 Processors (2.9 GHz) 2 X Twelve-Core Intel® Xeon® E5-2697 V2 Processors (2.7 GHz)
Memory 96G 128g/256g 256g
Disk controller
Disk Controller HBA with 512MB Batter Backed Write Cache
Disk Controller HBA with 512MB Batter Backed Write Cache Disk Controller HBA with 512MB Batter Backed Write Cache
Internal disks 4 x 300 GB 10,000 RPM SAS Disks 4 x 300 GB 10,000 RPM Disks 4 x 600 GB 10,000 RPM Disks
Infiniband 2 x QDR (40Gb/s) Ports 2 x QDR (40Gb/s) Ports 2 x QDR (40Gb/s) Ports
Ethernet 2 x 10 Gb Ethernet Ports based on the Intel 82599 10GbE Controller  4 x 1/10 Gb Ethernet Ports (copper) 4 x 1/10 Gb Ethernet Ports (copper)
Ethernet 4 x 1 Gb Ethernet Ports 2 x 10 Gb Ethernet Ports (optical) 2 x 10 Gb Ethernet Ports (optical)
Full Rack 96 CPU cores and 768 gb memory for database processing (12 CPU cores and 96 GB memory per Database Server)  128 CPU cores and 1TB or  2 TB memory for database processing (16 CPU cores and 256 GB memory per Database Server)  192 CPU cores and 2TB memory for database processing (24 CPU cores and up to 512 GB memory per Database Server)
Storage Cells
CPU
2 x Six-Core Intel® Xeon® L5640 (2.26 GHz) Processors
2 x Six-Core Intel® Xeon® E5-2630L (2.0 GHz processors) 2 x Six-Core Intel® Xeon® E5-2630 v2 (2.6 GHz processors)
Memory 24 GB 64 GB 96 GB
HC (High Capacity)
Disk Bandwidth¹
Up to 18 GB/second of uncompressed disk bandwidth
Up to 18 GB/second of uncompressed disk bandwidth
Up to 20 GB/second of uncompressed disk bandwidth
Flash Bandwidth¹ Up to 68 GB/second of uncompressed Flash data bandwidth Up to 93 GB/second of uncompressed Flash data bandwidth Up to 100 GB/second of uncompressed Flash data bandwidth
Disk IOPS ² Up to 28,000 Database Disk IOPS Up to 28,000 Database Disk IOPS Up to 32,000 Database Disk IOPS
Flash read IOPS ² Up to 1,500,000 Database Flash IOPS Up to 1,500,000 Database Flash IOPS Up to 2,660,000 Database Flash IOPS
Flash write IOPS³ N/A Up to 1,000,000 Database Flash IOPS Up to 1,680,000 Database Flash IOPS
Flash Data Capacity (raw) 5.3 TB Exadata Smart Flash Cache 22.4 TB 44.8 TB
Disk Data capacity (raw) 504 TB of raw disk data capacity 504 TB 672 TB
Disk Data capacity (Usable)
Up to 224 TB of uncompressed usable capacity
224 TB 300 TB
HP (High Performance)
Disk Bandwidth¹
Up to 25 GB/second of uncompressed disk bandwidth
Up to 25 GB/second of uncompressed disk bandwidth
Up to 24 GB/second of uncompressed disk bandwidth
Flash Bandwidth¹ Up to 75 GB/second of uncompressed Flash data bandwidth Up to 100 GB/second of uncompressed Flash data bandwidth Up to 100 GB/second of uncompressed Flash data bandwidth
Disk IOPS ² Up to 50,000 Database Disk IOPS Up to 50,000 Database Disk IOPS Up to 50,000 Database Disk IOPS
Flash read IOPS ² Up to 1,500,000 Database Flash IOPS Up to 1,500,000 Database Flash IOPS Up to 2,660,000 Database Flash IOPS
Flash write IOPS³ N/A Up to 1,000,000 Database Flash IOPS Up to 1,680,000 Database Flash IOPS
Flash Data Capacity (raw) 5.3 TB Exadata Smart Flash Cache 22.4 TB 44.8 TB
Disk Data capacity (raw) 100 TB of raw disk data capacity 100 TB 200 TB
Disk Data capacity (Usable)
Up to 45 TB of uncompressed usable capacity
45 TB 90 TB
¹Bandwidth is peak physical scan bandwidth achieved running SQL, assuming no database compression. Effective user data bandwidth is higher when database compression is used.
 ²Based on 8K IO requests running SQL. Note that the IO size greatly affects Flash IOPS. Others quote IOPS based on 2K or smaller IOs and are not relevant for databases.
³Based on 8K IO requests running SQL. Flash write I/Os measured at the storage servers after ASM mirroring. Database writes will usually issue multiple storage IOs to maintain redundancy.
⁴Raw capacity is measured in standard disk drive terminology with 1 GB = 1 billion bytes. Capacity is measured using normal powers of 2 space terminology with 1 TB = 1024 * 1024 * 1024 * 1024 bytes. Actual formatted capacity is less.
⁵Raw capacity is measured in standard disk drive terminology with 1 GB = 1 billion bytes. Capacity is measured using normal powers of 2 space terminology with 1 TB = 1024 * 1024 * 1024 * 1024 bytes. Actual formatted capacity is less.
⁶Actual space available for a database after mirroring (ASM normal redundancy) while also providing adequate space (one disk on Quarter and Half Racks and two disks on a Full Rack) to reestablish the mirroring protection after a disk failure in the normal redundancy case.

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